Drug addiction in Texas can make even the most honest person turn to dishonest and even illegal tactics to get what they need. Often, the person ends up accused of a crime and may spend time in jail or prison for the crime. While they must go cold turkey and cannot access drugs while locked up, they are then released into society the same as when they went in. They have no coping mechanisms to identify and deal with triggers that caused the abuse in the first place and are highly likely to be repeat offenders.

Drug court advocates encourage states to adopt drug court options rather than just incarceration. According to the Texas Association of Specialty Courts, which was created to provide funding and support for jurisdictions that want to establish drug courts, these innovative programs first began in 1989 in Miami. The intent is to create a court that is given the responsibility to handle offender cases where the accused is chemically dependent on a substance.

Drug courts provide them with a treatment program and intensive supervision while they go through it. The long-term goal is not to punish the offender for their crime, but rather to give them the tools they need to address the substance abuse, so the criminal behavior stops

These courts work hand in hand with the criminal justice system and require the offenders submit to random drug testing, visit support groups and go through intensive therapy and meet regularly with a probation officer. The end goal of drug courts is to provide support, treatment and funding that leads to the sobriety of the accused rather than punishment. As taxpayers foot the bill for the incarcerated, it is believed that it also a more cost-effective way to address those who are accused of drug offenses.

This is for educational purposes and should not be interpreted as legal advice.