Whenever a violent crime occurs in Plano, law enforcement authorities may feel pressure to bring the matter to a swift resolution. That pressure comes not simply from a desire to help a victim’s family feel a sense of closure, but also from an implied need to help the local community feel more secure. 

That pressure may not abate with the passage of time; indeed, the exact opposite may be true. As more time passes without significant action occurring in a criminal case, officials may feel experience even more stress to generate results. Yet that stress should never be an excuse to make rushes to judgment. 

Suspects identified over a decade after murder

It is not uncommon for criminal cases to takes months (or even years) to come to a resolution. Yet after many years, one may reasonably question the validity of any new evidence that may come forward (even when that evidence may relate to information authorities reviews during an initial investigation). According to KSAT.com, such as cited by investigators after an arrest occurred in a 13-year-old murder case involving a Universal City man. The suspect came to the attention of authorities shortly after the murder, as the belief existed that she was the getaway driver in a suspected robbery. Officials also issued warrants for two other suspects they believe participated in the crime. 

Questioning old evidence

While no one expects (or wants) law enforcement officials to give up on a criminal investigation, any actions they take should merit the same amount of scrutiny regardless of when they occur in relation to an offense. One who comes under suspicion for a decades-old crime should feel justified in challenging the charges against them (and the supposedly new accounts supporting them). Mounting such a challenge, however, may require professional legal assistance.